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Predicting Risk of Heart Failure for Diabetes Patients With Help From Machine Learning

Sep 19, 2019
Brigham and Women's Hospital

Investigators used artificial intelligence to identify top 10 variables that can predict, with a high degree of accuracy, future heart failure among patients living with diabetes.

Heart failure is an important potential complication of type 2 diabetes that occurs frequently and can lead to death or disability. Earlier this month, late-breaking trial results revealed that a new class of medications known as SGLT2 inhibitors may be helpful for patients with heart failure. These therapies may also be used in patients with diabetes to prevent heart failure from occurring in the first place. However, a way of accurately identifying which diabetes patients are most at risk for heart failure remains elusive. A new study led by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital and UT Southwestern Medical Center unveils a new, machine-learning derived model that can predict, with a high degree of accuracy, future heart failure among patients with diabetes...



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Essential Amino Acids Benefits for Weight Loss, Muscle Gain and Even Mood

Sep 19, 2019
Rachael Link, MS, RD

Your body needs all amino acids to function and thrive, but some can be produced in the body while others need to be obtained from food. Getting enough through either dietary sources or supplementation can help enhance weight loss, preserve muscle mass, improve exercise performance, boost mood and promote better sleep.

Protein is incredibly important when it comes to your health. It makes up the structure of your bones, muscles and skin and is used to build tissues and synthesize hormones, enzymes and neurotransmitters. Amino acids are the building blocks of protein, which is why getting enough essential amino acids in your diet is critical to maintaining optimal health and preventing protein deficiency.

So what are amino acids, and how can you be sure you gett the right mix to keep your body healthy? Here's what you need to know...



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Memory T Cells Shelter in Bone Marrow, Boosting Immunity in Mice with Restricted Diets

Sep 18, 2019
National Institutes of Health News Release

Though this phenomenon has yet to be studied in humans, the findings suggest how the immune system may have evolved to help mammals survive periods of limited food availability while keeping their immunity intact.

Even when taking in fewer calories and nutrients, humans and other mammals usually remain protected against infectious diseases they have already encountered.  This may be because memory T cells, which are located throughout the body and required to maintain immune responses to infectious agents, according to scientists at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of HealthTheir study in mice, published online today in Cell, also found that animals undergoing dietary restriction were better protected against tumors and bacterial infections than animals with unrestricted diets.

Researchers led by Yasmine Belkaid, Ph.D...



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Prolonged Antibiotic Treatment May Alter Preterm Infants' Microbiome

Sep 18, 2019
National Institutes of Health News Release

The researchers do not know the long-term effects of these genome changes, which they term "microbiota scars." They note that previous studies linked antibiotic treatment during infancy with allergies, psoriasis, obesity, diabetes and inflammatory bowel disease later in life.

Treating preterm infants with antibiotics for more than 20 months appears to promote the development of multidrug-resistant gut bacteria, suggests a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. The research appears in Nature Microbiology.

Researchers used high-speed DNA sequencing and advanced computational analysis to study stool samples from 32 infants born very preterm who received antibiotic treatment for 21 months (in the neonatal intensive care unit and after discharge), nine infants born very preterm who received antibiotics for less than a week, and 17 healthy term and late preterm infants who hadn't received antibiotics...



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Why the Self-Help Industry is Contributing to the Loneliness Epidemic & What We Can Do About It

Sep 18, 2019
Dr. Caroline Leaf

We need to understand that it's not just about us; it is about us in the world. If we truly want to help ourselves, we have to be intentional about our "social health". This means being connected in deep, meaningful ways, not just cursory lunches, obligatory meetings or the odd "hello" now and again.

The self-help industry appears, from its name alone, to be a good thing: who doesn't want to help themselves? Who doesn't want to be more independent and self-sufficient? However, as I discuss in this week's blog and podcast, it does have a darker side, and can often make us more self-involved and isolated, which, in turn, can have a negative impact on both our mental and physical health...



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Graphene Shield Shows Promise in Blocking Mosquito Bites

Sep 17, 2019
National Institutes of Health News Release

Results show that graphene, a tight, honeycomb lattice of carbon, could be an alternative to chemicals now used in mosquito repellants and protective clothing. Until this study, insect-bite protection was an unexplored function of graphene-based materials.

An innovative graphene-based film helps shield people from disease-carrying mosquitos, according to a new study funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), part of the National Institutes of Health. The research, conducted by the Brown University Superfund Research Center, Providence, Rhode Island, is published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

"These findings could lead to new protective methods against mosquitos, without the environmental or human health effects of other chemical-based repellants," said Heather Henry, Ph.D., a health scientist administrator with the NIEHS (Continue reading...)




5 Facts to Know About Testosterone and Aging in Modern Times

Sep 17, 2019
Dr. Don Colbert

Low testosterone affects many men, both under and over 60 years old, and is becoming an increasingly diagnosed condition. There are many factors that affect testosterone and aging, and some declines are due to modern, sedentary lifestyles and environmental pollutants.

Aging has a lot of effects on the human body. Some are positive, and some are not as positive. One effect that gets a lot of attention in men is the natural decline of testosterone.

And while this is a natural part of the aging process, there are some concerning facts about modern-day lifestyle that may expedite and exaggerate the decline.

What's more, there are mortality-linked health conditions associated with low testosterone in addition to the hormonal and sexual challenges.

Here's your guide to testosterone, and 5 facts to know about testosterone and aging in modern times...



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Cancer-Causing Caramel Color

Sep 16, 2019
Michael Greger M.D. FACLM

Caramel coloring may be the most widely consumed food coloring in the world.  Unfortunately, its manufacture can sometimes lead to the formation of a carcinogen called methylimidazole, which was identified as a cancer-causing chemical in 2007.

For the purposes of its Proposition 65 labeling law, California set a daily limit at 29 micrograms a day. So, how much cancer might caramel-colored soft drinks be causing? We didn't know…until now… My video Which has more Caramel Coloring Carcinogens: Coke or Pepsi? explores these questions and more.

Researchers tested 110 soft drink samples off store shelves in California and around the New York metropolitan area, including Connecticut and New Jersey...



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Developing Therapeutic Strategies for Pregnant Women with Lupus

Sep 16, 2019
Virginia Tech

"For patients with autoimmune lupus, diet and probiotics are the two relatively easy and acceptable approaches that can potentially improve disease management through modulating the gut microbiota…"

Systemic lupus erythematosus, a chronic autoimmune disease commonly referred to as lupus or SLE, has been compared to volatile, unprovoked brawls within the body.

The disease, which has no cure, operates much like an allergic reaction gone awry: When activated, the immune system also attacks the body's healthy cells, tissues, and organs, causing inflammation and producing a host of symptoms that, though unique to each person, are universally called flares.

A highly gender-biased disease, lupus afflicts females some nine times more than males. Because of the disease's unpredictable turns and debilitating flares – the risks of which are elevated in postpartum women – females with the disease are often advised to avoid pregnancy altogether...



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